On this week’s episode, I have actress Paula Marshall (Euphoria, Walker, Gary Unmarried, and many many more) and we dive into the origins of his career. We also talk about how she dealt with being a new mom and working on a sitcom at the same time. There is so much more so make sure you tune in.

Show Notes

Paula Marshall on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepaulamarshall/?hl=en

Paula Marshall IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0005191/

Paula Marshall on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paula_Marshall

A Paper Orchestra on Website – https://michaeljamin.com/book

A Paper Orchestra on Audible – https://www.audible.com/ep/creator?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R&irclickid=wsY0cWRTYxyPWQ32v63t0WpwUkHzByXJyROHz00&irgwc=1

A Paper Orchestra on Amazon – https://www.amazon.com/Audible-A-Paper-Orchestra/dp/B0CS5129X1/ref=sr_1_4?crid=19R6SSAJRS6TU&keywords=a+paper+orchestra&qid=1707342963&sprefix=a+paper+orchestra%2Caps%2C149&sr=8-4

A Paper Orchestra on Goodreads – https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/203928260-a-paper-orchestra

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Autogenerated Transcript

Paula Marshall:
But a lot of parents, they go to jobs and then they come home or they don’t work at all, and then it’s just mom 100% and they’re probably exhausted and happy. Some of my friends, I feel like they’re like, I’m so glad. Finally I get to whatever. And either they’re retiring and they get to go travel and like, no, I’m an actor. I’m looking for a gig, whatever. I don’t think actors ever truly retire. I think we don’t. I don’t.

Michael Jamin:
You are listening to What the Hell is Michael Jamin talking about conversations and writing, art and creativity. Today’s episode is brought to you by my debut collection of True Stories, a paper orchestra available in print, ebook and audiobook to purchase. And to support me on this podcast, please visit michael jamin.com/book and now on with the show.
Welcome everyone. My next guest is actress Paula Marshall. She has been, I worked with her years ago on a show called Out of Practice, I think it was like 2005. But Paul, before I let you get a word in edgewise, I got to tell everyone, your credits are crazy long, so your intro may take a long time. So I’m going to just give you some of the highlights to remind you of your incredible body of work here. Really these are just the highlights. She works a ton. So well, let’s see. I guess we could start with One Life To Live. That might’ve been your first one. Grapevine Life goes on. Wonder Years Seinfeld. I heard of that one. Perry Mason diagnosis. Murder Wild Oats. I’m skipping here. Nash Bridges. You did a couple Chicago Suns Spin. City Cupid Snoops Sports Night, the Weber Show. It doesn’t end.
Just shoot Me, which I worked on. I didn’t even know you were on that. Maybe I wasn’t there. Hitting Hills and Out of Practice, which we did together. Veronica Mars, nip Tuck, shark ca Fornication. You did a bunch of Gary Unmarried House friends with Benefits, the exes CSI, the Mentalist, two and a Half Men Murder in the First Major Crimes. What else have we got here? Goer Gibbons, I dunno what that is. You have to tell me what that is. And then Modern Family Euphoria. You did a bunch of them. Walker. Paula, I’m exhausted and I’m going to steal your joke here. You can because I’m going to say you’re Paula Marshall, but you may know me as Carla Gina. That’s what used to tell me Carla

Paula Marshall:
And I know Carla,

Michael Jamin:
But know

Paula Marshall:
She’s like the younger version of me. Slightly shorter,

Michael Jamin:
Bigger, bigger. Boop. But you have done so much. I’m going to jump, I’m going to jump into the hardest part. I’m wondering if this is the hardest part for you is being a guest star on a show because you have to jump in with the cast, you have to know the rules and everything. Is that harder?

Paula Marshall:
Yes, a hundred percent. It’s harder when I guest star on any shows, if I haven’t seen the show, I watch three or four on YouTube just so I know who’s who and the vibe and the energy. When I guest star on Modern Family I their last season and some could say I canceled the show by being there. I’ve been called a show killer

Michael Jamin:
Before. I remember You don’t let Right.

Paula Marshall:
I still have not let that go. I like to say I’ve just worked on so many different shows at its peak and then it died anyway. It’s hard because they’re all in a flow and depending on the other actors, how cool they are to kind of throw the ball at you.

Michael Jamin:
But do you have to identify who’s the alpha dog on set? Is that what your plan is? It’s

Paula Marshall:
Pretty clear right away. Really? Yeah. I mean besides whoever’s first on the call sheet, I remember one of the producers of Snoop’s, David Kelly’s first big bomb. That was me.

Michael Jamin:
It was a sure thing what happened?

Paula Marshall:
You know what? I’m not sure. Well, when it was supposed to be a comedy quickly turned into a drama, it was not great. But as one of the producers of Snoop said, you don’t fuck with the first person on the call sheet. You don’t fuck with him. And so you identify that person and depending, it’s funny because I’ve worked with so many great people and so many assholes too. Like David Deney. Damn, is he cool? He’s so nice. When I worked on fornication with him, he set a tone for just the set, the crew, the actors, this freedom just to try things. And I remember during my, it was like the first day naked throwing up,

Michael Jamin:
Wait, were you nervous? Why were you throwing up?

Paula Marshall:
Hello? Of course. But I

Michael Jamin:
Remember you’re never nervous, Paul, let me tell you who you were. I’m totally nervous. No, you’re the most self-assured person probably I’ve ever worked with. You’re very confident.

Paula Marshall:
Thank you. I’m acting

Michael Jamin:
Acting.

Paula Marshall:
But California occasion, it was my first day onset naked, fake fucking. And I remember standing there, it was yesterday, and either tweaking you and touching you up. And I say to everyone, what’s amazing, what I’ll do for $2,900 when a strike is pending? It was the writer’s strike way back in the day. And I remember getting this part on fornication and I’m like to all the girls in the audition room, when we used to have auditions in rooms with other people, I looked around, I’m like, we’re not going to really have to be naked. We’re not those type of actresses. And they’re like, no, no, no. And I’m like standing there. Yeah, yeah. I was naked.

Michael Jamin:
Was that your first time in a show being naked? I mean

Paula Marshall:
Topless

Michael Jamin:
Show

Paula Marshall:
On a show?

Michael Jamin:
Yes. Because you were in a model, I’m sure as a model, you’re doing wardrobe changes all the time.

Paula Marshall:
I used to model. I was naked a few things back in the day.

Michael Jamin:
So were you really nervous about it? I mean, I imagine you would be, but

Paula Marshall:
Standing there naked is one thing. You just kind of have to dive in the pool, in the cold, cold pool and let it go because you got to put on the confident jacket, I guess I obviously wore a lot around you, but I mean it’s more uncomfortable, the fake sex scenes, it’s more technical and awkward. It’s just but nervous. I dunno. Yeah, you’re excited. But I’m also excited when I walk on stage on a sitcom before, if I’m not already in the set, when they start rolling, I’m backstage. How’s my hair? Shit, how am I doing? Okay? I get hyped up until you do it once and people laugh and you’re like, oh,

Michael Jamin:
Okay. Are you worried about going up on your lines at all? Is that at all you’re thinking about?

Paula Marshall:
Yes, especially now. Oh shit, my memory. It’s just that prevagen, I’m going to look it up later, but yeah, you do. But if you in a sitcom situation, we run it, we rehearse it all week. Still

Michael Jamin:
The lines are changing all week. That’s all I

Paula Marshall:
Know. But they’re changing all week. But then you run it and you drill it on TV shows like euphoria or whatever. Yeah, you run it. But then again, they don’t really change the lines at all. But yeah, you were a little bit, but then you got a great script supervisor that you’re like, I’m up. And then they say it and then you go back and you do it. But yeah, always, I’m always really nervous until maybe the second take

Michael Jamin:
Of any, the hardest thing it seems to me is just like, okay, you’re naked and you have to forget that there’s all these people there. You have

Paula Marshall:
To

Michael Jamin:
Completely, it’s almost like you’re crazy to have to be able to forget that,

Paula Marshall:
Michael, when you paid $2,900.
That’s right. I was shocked. That’s all you get for being naked. Yeah, you do. You are nervous. But I don’t know. I was 40 then, so I looked pretty good naked, although I only had four days notice. Back then we didn’t have ozempic, so I was like, okay, I can’t, no salt, no bread. And I remember in that shot that the camera guy, they decided in the moment, Hey, can you walk over to David? And then bent over, he’s on the bed and then kiss him. I’m like, well, that depends. What’s your lens there? You got there? And I’m like, how wide is your lens? And he looked at me and I’m like, I’m a photographer. I like taking pictures. So I know. And I’m like, so I’m going to bend over with my white ass and I had four days notice on this and my ass is just going to be in the pretty much. And you’re like, okay, I could do it. But you hope for body makeup. I don’t know. Don’t you think I had any, I should have demanded body

Michael Jamin:
Makeup. And this was probably even before there were, what do they call them now? Intimacy

Paula Marshall:
Coordinators?

Michael Jamin:
Yes. Right.

Paula Marshall:
I mean, here’s the thing. I guess it helps when you’re not a loud mouth person like me. And even then it’s hard to go, Hey dude, keep your tongue in your mouth. You don’t want it in your mouth. Sometimes you’re like, damn. He’s a great kisser. Jason Bateman, I enjoyed the tongue in my mouth. So

Michael Jamin:
It kind of depends

Paula Marshall:
On who’s sticking in the tongue. But the intimacy coordinator, I think it’s just so people know what’s going to kind of happen and get it. But California case, no, we didn’t have that. This movie I was naked on with Peter Weller called The New Age. No, I remember in the middle of the scene, I’m on the bed and he’s looking down at me and during one take he decides to suck on my nipple. Shocking. I turned bright red, which is what I do when I get nervous. And I’m like, dude, what are you doing? He goes, I dunno, I just thought it’d be fun. I’m like, okay. And I don’t think they used it, but if there was an intimacy coordinator back then, I probably would’ve known.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah. So it’s

Paula Marshall:
Good I guess. But it’s corny and you feel silly.

Michael Jamin:
Oh my God, I’m glad you mentioned the photography thing. That was one of my memories from working together and out of practice. This was before people had camera phones and cell phones and you carried a camera everywhere. And I remember thinking, you’re the star of a sitcom. You’re the star. I mean, you’re an artist doing her craft, and yet it’s still not enough that you wanted to work on something. You wanted to do something else as well.

Paula Marshall:
Maybe it’s my parents growing up, they always had these really cool black and white pictures of them. And I used to look at them and go, wow, that was your life then. And it was hard to even imagine when they were so young. And so it’s like photos are life to me. And I guess I don’t want to forget the moments of my life that are important. And so I always would bring a camera with me on set, on location more than sitcom stages aren’t as conducive to really cool shots. But yeah, I like capturing life.

Michael Jamin:
And you’re still doing it on 35

Paula Marshall:
Millimeter? I still do it, although I did give in and I have a digital now because it’s easier. It’s easier. Develop film.

Michael Jamin:
Many. You took my headshot from me and for many years I way too long. I used that as my headshot.

Paula Marshall:
Yeah, it was good. I remember

Michael Jamin:
It was great. And I wore Danny’s shirt, you go, yeah, put this on. You look terrible. Whatever I was wearing, still

Paula Marshall:
Do that. People still come over my friends and I’m like, you need a headshot. Put Danny’s shirt on. He has some nice shirts.

Michael Jamin:
It’s so funny.

Paula Marshall:
Yeah, I do. I still like taking pictures.

Michael Jamin:
I got to share another memory I had from out of practice, which I cherish this one. So it was right before it was show night for some reason. I don’t know why. I had to run up pages to the cast. And maybe you were in the green room or you were somewhere upstairs. I don’t know what the hell dressing. I don’t know what was going on. I knock on the door and all of you we’re standing in a circle holding hands. And Henry goes, Michael, you’re just in inside. Come on in. And then I go in time for what? And then he tapped. This blew my, I love this memory. And you guys were just like, I don’t know what you would call it, but you were invoking a good show to be supportive of each other and to be brave and true. And I was like, I can’t believe I felt so honored that I was included in, I was like, are you serious,

Paula Marshall:
Henry? I actually forgot that memory and thank you for reminding me of it. Henry’s just, he’s something special.

Michael Jamin:
He is.

Paula Marshall:
I know there’s rumors. Oh, who’s the nicest guy in Hollywood? Henry Winkler. It’s because it is, is I could text him right now and he would literally text me. Within eight minutes he will text me back. Oh, Paula, it’s been so, he’s just a dear. And so he is, again, back to the, when you go on set and who creates that energy? Although Chris Gorham, I think was the first on the call sheet, not Henry Winkler, but Henry was our dad. I mean, he was such a pro and yeah, he just created this lovely energy there.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah. Oh wow. So that’s not common then for other shows that you’ve worked on. People don’t do that. That’s not a theater thing. It seems like a theater thing

Paula Marshall:
You would think. I think, I don’t know, maybe it was a happy days thing.

Michael Jamin:
Why don’t you start it on your next show? Why don’t you start doing

Paula Marshall:
It? I think I might. I’m going to make it now.

Michael Jamin:
I thought it was so interesting. I was like, wow. But it’s getting back to that first point, even the first, the first person on the call sheet technically is the head cheese. But they might not be the most difficult by far at all. I mean, you don’t know who’s the boss. That’s true, right?

Paula Marshall:
I mean sometimes the and character is an asshole. I mean, I think mostly people when they don’t really want to be there, they kind of rebel. I’ve always wanted to be on a sitcom. I

Michael Jamin:
Remember. Did that change? Oh, go ahead, please.

Paula Marshall:
I just remember, I believe my first sitcom was Seinfeld. I may have done a guest spot on some other one that maybe never aired or I can’t remember. Or maybe I just think it’s cooler to say my first sitcom was Seinfeld. I’m not sure. But that show, I don’t know. There’s a magic. But they didn’t do any of that either. But they kind of really invited me in and I dunno, I’m just thinking,

Michael Jamin:
Do you prefer to do sitcoms, multi-camera sitcoms? Yes. Yes. Because the audience.

Paula Marshall:
Because the audience, because it’s a high, I’ve never gotten anywhere else in my life. Not that I need to be high, but damn. When you go out and you make people laugh with a look or a line or a physical movement, I mean it’s magic. And working with the actor, knowing more like theater, which by the way, I’ve never done

Michael Jamin:
Well, why don’t you do theater then?

Paula Marshall:
I don’t know. I don’t know. I’ll call my agent another thing I’ll write down.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah, do that.

Paula Marshall:
But probably only if it’s a comedy. But it’s that magic that you don’t have to go and do another take and then they turn around and then you got a close up again. I mean, it’s boring. Like our television, there’s no magic in it

Michael Jamin:
Ever.

Paula Marshall:
Except on euphoria. I have to say there’s magic there.

Michael Jamin:
Why do you say that?

Paula Marshall:
Because the writing directing the story level of, I mean, when Marsha is my character, when Marsha actually had a couple things to say. I remember I called or I spoke with Sam Levinson and I was like, dude, it’s me, right? You wrote an eight page monologue almost for Marsha to say. And he goes, yeah, I can’t wait to see it. And I’m like, oh my God. I was so nervous. I studied for three weeks. There was no rewrites. And then it’s me and Jacob all Lorde on set. And we get there and there’s no rush, there’s no limitation. There’s just like, what do you want to do? And he’s like, I kind of feel like you’re doing this and then you’re doing the cookies and a lot of movement. But we did it until it felt good, and then we knew it, and there was a magic there. No one’s laughing at me. But there’s something special about that show. I mean, I’ve heard rumors like, oh, and on set. And I’m like, ah, not for me. Not for me at all. Not for you. No, it’s amazing.

Michael Jamin:
What do you do though? When you’re on set and you have an idea how you want to play or speech, how you want to deliver speech, and your scene partner is just on doing something completely fucking different. How do you handle that?

Paula Marshall:
If you know, don’t have a say, meaning you’re a guest, darn. You do what they tell you to. How high do you want me to jump? That’s what you do. But if you’re working together and you’re equal parties, you probably have run it before. But I would say if they’re not doing something that I want, then I use it and I am frustrated in the scene, or I just use whatever they’re giving me because that’s all I got. And I try to put that into my character.

Michael Jamin:
How much training have you had though? That’s very actor speak.

Paula Marshall:
It really did sound a little actory, and I

Michael Jamin:
Apologize for that. No, it’s good. I like it.

Paula Marshall:
I mean, I don’t know. I lived in New York City and I took acting class with this guy named Tony Aon and Jennifer Aniston was in my class and Oh wow.
Just a bunch of young people, but not all that much. Not all that much. I think the comedy thing, I didn’t even know I was funny with Seinfeld, the guest stars aren’t usually funny in sitcoms. The lead, the main characters, the stars of the show are funny guest stars just kind of throw the ball and you know what I mean? But something happened after I was on Seinfeld and then I read for, I guess it was Wild Oats, which was with Paul Rudd and Jan Marie hpp. And Tim Conlin. It was a sitcom on Fox. It was the same year that another show called Friends was coming out. And I remember them. Someone was interviewing us saying, oh, there’s another show that NBC is doing with a group of friends. It’s kind of like yours. And we’re all friends. What’s that cut to?
And ours was canceled after one season, but I think the first time I was like, oh shit, I can do this. I know how to deliver a joke. But I never learned that again. It just happened one year in pilot season just kind of happened. And my agents were like, oh, Paul is funny. Okay. And then one time I remember I read for a pilot, after you do so many comedies, then people go, well, she’s a comedic actress, she can’t do drama. And then you’re like, the fuck. Of course I could do drama. I remember one time during this callback, no original, just the first audition. And I had heard the casting director doesn’t think or only thinks you’re funny, doesn’t think you’re as good. Dramatic. Wow.

Michael Jamin:
Obviously if you could do comedy, you could do drama.

Paula Marshall:
No, you would think it’s the other way around. It never works. It is really hard to do

Michael Jamin:
Comedy.

Paula Marshall:
But literally, I was like, well, I’m so angry that she thinks I can’t. Finally, they couldn’t find this girl, the character for the pilot. And then they finally, okay, Paula, we’ll see her. So I get in there, and it was Davis Guggenheim was the director. I love Davis. After I read, I think it was three scenes. And during the last scene, I broke down and I was in tears over something and I look up with, you couldn’t have placed the tear better. And I look up and I ended the scene and Davis goes, my god, Paula Marshall, you are one fine actress. And I do this. I look at the casting drifter and I go, you see, I’m not just funny. And I grabbed my bag and I walked out and I go, well, I just fucked myself for any future director again. There was something that came over me and I was like, I need you to know that I am not just one thing or the other. And then Davis probably three weeks later, texts me, I’ve been fighting every day for you. And I’m like, what are you talking about when you get these weird texts from people? I’m like, did I get the part? I got the part and they didn’t want to see me.

Michael Jamin:
It’s so interesting. I mean, obviously you’re a working actor, you work a lot. You’re successful, and yet you still feel like you’re placed in this box and you have to prove yourself and get out of it.

Paula Marshall:
But there’s something I really love about, there’s part of me that I want to read, and I want everyone to look at that tape and go, fuck, I wish we could hire her. I wish there weren’t the limitations and we didn’t have to pick Carla at you now or whatever. I wish we could pick Paula. I want them to go, fuck man. She was really good. I want to stick in their brain. I always would cancel auditions if I wasn’t ready for it. If I really knew I wasn’t going to kill it, I wouldn’t go, or I won’t put myself on tape. I don’t have enough time to prepare for it because that’s the last thing they see of you.

Michael Jamin:
I

Paula Marshall:
Want it to be the best thing they see of me. So I only want to leave them with that because they’re not going to remember that other stuff.

Michael Jamin:
That’s a good point though. Are you doing a lot of self tape now? Is there anything in person?

Paula Marshall:
I have not had any auditions in person yet. Wow. Her actress ever Carradine. I think she’s had her third one, and she always posts about it. She’s so cute. And I think she booked one. No, I have a room now in my house. It’s the tape room. And I’ve got a nice beauty light and I’ve got the tripod again. It’s kind of easy for me because I have photography stuff.

Michael Jamin:
But who are you acting again or does Danny help you out?

Paula Marshall:
Well, Danny will sometimes read with me. My daughter would read with me. And sometimes when I’m all by myself, I read with myself. I will have a tape of the other voice, which is, or sometimes I leave space and then I put the audio in later. I mean, it’s crazy the stuff that happens during Covid. We’ve got very creative over here.

Michael Jamin:
But in some ways though, because this sometimes a casting director is like, yeah, yeah, there couldn’t be more wooden. And so in some ways it’s got to be easier for you, right?

Paula Marshall:
Yes and no. Yes, because I get to pick the take I want,

Michael Jamin:
Right?

Paula Marshall:
Two, because two, I didn’t even say one a b, I don’t get nervous, so there’s no nerves to hold me back or Oh man, I should have done it. Or I mess up. I just do another take. But then there’s also, there’s something about going in and being vulnerable in front of all those people and showing them what you can do. And especially in a comedy, I, it was like a zoom callback for a comedy. And I live in the hills and maybe it was the wifi or that slight timing was off just enough or the reader wasn’t funny and I’m trying to connect with this dot. It was hard. There was no magic in it and you couldn’t feel the other person. And so I think in a way, it’s good in a way. It’s really not good. So I’m willing to do whatever to get anything because I pay for college.

Michael Jamin:
But also, there’s also the fact the to drive across town, I mean, that’s got to get old, right? Driving everywhere.

Paula Marshall:
But when you’re an actor, everything stops. You get a script, everything stops. You’re not making dinner, you’re not going out, you’re not watching that movie or the show. You drop everything and then you focus on it. And hopefully, thankfully, because of the strike and the new negotiations that they got for us, I think we don’t have to do a self tape over the weekend. We need to have enough time to actually prepare for it, which is amazing. Most of the time. Gary unmarried, I think I got the audition at eight o’clock in the morning. It was to meet producers at 11 o’clock the next day. And you’re like, ah, okay, here I go. It’s really hard to put all that energy and to them something great. And I never understand why you’re casting people or producers. Don’t give us more time because we want to give you something great. We don’t want to go in there and read. I don’t. I want to perform for you. And it’s hard to do when I don’t have enough time to do it. I also have a life, so I have other things, but you kind of do. You really drop it. You drop everything for an audition.

Michael Jamin:
It’s interesting though. I want to get touched on something you said. You said it’s hard to be vulnerable on camera, but then you said comedy, and do you feel like it’s harder to be vulnerable? Because when I think of vulnerable, I think drama, not comedy.

Paula Marshall:
Yes. But there’s nothing funnier. I remember my husband in many situations will say, I’ll be upset or crying and I’ll say something really funny, but humor comes out of the reality, like your honest to goodness, open soul, like your heart. The funniest stuff I think comes out of me when I’m in a vulnerable position, if I’m angry, if I’m sad when I’m just feeling whatever. So I don’t know. I think in many sitcoms I’ve cried. And how do you

Michael Jamin:
Get past that though? How do you get past that vulnerability thing? I mean, are you a hundred percent past it or is there any reservations?

Paula Marshall:
Ask that again. Sorry.

Michael Jamin:
Very clear saying, well, when you’re vulnerable on camera or trying to be, can you go, I don’t know. Is there a limit to your vulnerability, do you think on camera or are you willing to go there all the time? As much, as far as you want?

Paula Marshall:
I guess so most of the time it depends on how much tears you have. And I usually, if the writing is good, and that’s the big if this thing that I ended up booking with Davis Guggenheim, it was with John Corbett, and I had to cry and it was maybe like a steady cam up the stairs and going, and I break down and I crumbled to my knees, and I swear to God, I did it. Maybe 17 takes. And then we come around and turn around on him and I end up crying again. And John, after we, they yelled cut, he goes, Paula, what are you doing? Why are you crying again? I go, I don’t know. The words are making me cry. I’m just tapped in doing it. They wipe it away. But you got to be careful because I’m vain and you got to look like you’re not crying, and I’m really crying.
So I get red and my eyes get bloodshot. You look different and the snot and you got to fix the whatever, makeup. But no, but when it’s great, when the writing is great, of course, usually you don’t have to do it. 17 takes, it was just had a lot to do with the steady cam and whatever. But usually you do it in three takes and you nail it and it’s good, and they’re like, wow, that was great. Let’s move on. So you don’t really have to in a movie, if you nail it, you nail it and they move on.

Michael Jamin:
What do you do though when you’re in it and you feel like you’re slipping out of it?

Paula Marshall:
Okay, so that when I drink this, so
I have at least one of those before every tape night, I’ve always drink a Coke. If I can’t, the writing isn’t talking to me. If I can’t relate to it, I do that substitute thing. If I have to cry, and this is really not making me cry, the subject and the words I substitute for something else that makes me cry. I’m a freakishly emotional person. I cry a lot. I’m very sensitive. You wouldn’t really think that because kind of like Danny calls me bottom line, Marshall, and I’m very tough and whatever and no nonsense. And I say it like it is, and I will always tell you if you look fat in that dress, I like to be honest, but I don’t know.

Michael Jamin:
But is there a moment where you feel like you’re okay? You’re on, you’re giving a speech, you’re in a scene, and then you’re like, oh, I’m acting now.

Paula Marshall:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean, every once in a while, I mean, I’ll finish the scene. I don’t want to stop myself. They might like it and for whatever reason, but I’ll always say, can I have another one? Can I please have another one? Or Oh my gosh, I really like the second take. Just can you make a note of that, that the second take was much better. They know it’s obvious when you see someone telling the truth, it’s obvious which one is better, but you can’t just tell the truth once and then move on because you don’t know. Maybe there was a sound issue on that take. No. So it’s tricky. Every once in a while you think you have it. The crappy thing is when they come around to you or they start on you and then you finally figure something out. I remember Bette Midler, we were doing the scene and they were on us first.
It was a movie, I guess Danny and I did the scene together and it was bet opposite on a table. And they go to her, they turn the camera on her, and then she goes, oh, I just figured it out. We’re like, no, the opposite. We did her first. Forgive me. We did her first and then they came on us. And then she goes, oh, I just figured out the scene. Can I do it again? And Carl Reiner’s like, no, we got to move. No, we’re out of here. So sometimes it takes a while to figure it all out, and she just thought she didn’t nail it. It’s Bette Midler. She nails every take all the time

Michael Jamin:
You are listening to, what the Hell is Michael Jamin talking about? Today’s episode is brought to you by my new book, A Paper Orchestra, A collection of True Stories. John Mayer says, it’s fantastic. It’s multi timal. It runs all levels of the pyramid at the same time. His knockout punches are stinging, sincerity, and Kirks Review says, those who appreciate the power of simple stories to tell us about human nature or who are bewitched by a storyteller who has mastered his craft, will find a delightful collection of vignettes, a lovely anthology that strikes a perfect balance between humor and poignancy. So my podcast is not advertiser supported. I’m not running ads here. So if you’d like to support me or the podcast, check out my book, go get an ebook or a paperback, or if you really want to treat yourself, check out the audio book. Go to michael jamin.com/book. And now back to our show.
Do you have these conversations with them? Do you have conversations with actors with more experience and I don’t know, are you still trying to learn from them?

Paula Marshall:
I just pay attention to what they’re doing. I don’t think I pick their brains like that, but I just watch them and I watch and I see

Michael Jamin:
What are you looking for?

Paula Marshall:
Well, sometimes technically how they do it. I remember my first movie, Hellraiser three, I learned a lot about continuity,
Which is something they don’t really teach in acting class. If I’m going to play my drink up and sip it, I have to do that every single time. If I’m going to eat in the scene, I got to do it every single time, and I have to figure that out. And you have to really, if you’re really going to eat, you got to really eat. Not teeny little bites, make your choice. But I learned things from different people. I remember Robert Duvall, I played his daughter in a movie and he would act and he kept going until his body knew it was over. And I remember the director had yelled cut at one point and he got really mad. He goes, I wasn’t done, but he had finished talking. And he goes, I’m still acting here. It’s like, I’m still walking here. But it was like, I’m still acting.
I’m still doing, there’s still so much more there. I observe and I see how they deal with issues and problems in their focus. ISHKA Harte guest star on that show of hers, and we auditioned a lot in the beginning. We came up at the same time and just everything was so serious to her. She really so passionate about her show and she threw away nothing. It was really kind of impressive after a hundred seasons now that she cared so much because some people after four Seasons, they’re like ready to go. They’re like, I got a movie down, I’m ready to go. But there’s certain people like Maka who from day one till again, I think it’s 25 seasons or 24 or something crazy. I remember when I worked with her and I hadn’t seen her in 15 years or something, I just am like, God, how rich is she? And so instead I was like, tacky. I’m not going to say that. So again, I walk up to her and it was emotional that we hadn’t seen each other in so long. I hugged her and I said, how big is your house? She goes, I can’t complain.

Michael Jamin:
I’m like,

Paula Marshall:
But she’s very passionate and so many actors are, and then there’s some who are not and who are ready to go

Michael Jamin:
And who are they? Not names, but why are they there? Are they just rock stars who became actors? You don’t know. It just falls into a job like that.

Paula Marshall:
There was one person and he just seemed really angry all the time. I don’t think he was just a happy person. If you don’t like doing this, I’m not sure why you’re doing it. I don’t know. There’s just something inside you. I mean, this is the greatest thing ever to be paid to do what you love. And again, when my daughter said she wanted to be an actress, an actor, sorry, I was so happy. I was like, that’s where I found joy in my life. I grew up in Rockville, Maryland, and I didn’t know anybody, and I just watched the Mary Tyler Moore show, and I went, yep, that’s what I want.
How do I do that? I had no idea, none. And to find joy there. So when a person is coming to set and they’re angry, it could be, they don’t like the words actors are very particular about. If your dialogue is not great, it’s really hard. It’s so much easier when you have great dialogue and the scene makes sense and the relationships you buy them. It’s so easy to do it. It’s effortless and it’s so real and it’s so honest. And then when you’ve got this other stuff and you have to say the name of the person to remember that it’s very cookie cutter network television, which you would think at this point would look at streaming and go, yeah, there’s always something right over there because the quality is just beyond Well,

Michael Jamin:
How did you figure it out then? Okay, you’re in Maryland. How did you figure out you stopped in New York first. What was that about?

Paula Marshall:
Did I moved to New York? I modeled in Georgetown as a local model there, doing little ads for Montgomery reward. And I didn’t really want to go to college. My parents didn’t make me go to college. I think I had two grand in my pocket from doing things here and there. I started doing commercials locally. And this woman by the name of Jay Sumner, who was the booker at this modeling agency called Panache, she said, we were at Champions. It was a bar called Champions. And though how I was there drinking at the bar, I don’t know, I think I was 18. She said, Paula, you’re so much more interesting in person than you are in a piece of paper, meaning I’m pretty, I’m good enough on paper, but you’re so much more interesting in real life. And she goes, I think you should be an actress.
And I’m like, okay, really? And I’m like, well, I always used to watch Mary Taylor Moore and all of that, but I’m from Maryland, how am I going to do? And she goes, I know somebody. I know someone in New York named Dian Littlefield, who’s a manager, and I can set you up with a meeting. I’m like, what? So I ended up moving to New York City. Modeling was my waitressing job. I got a lot of money. It didn’t take a lot of time. It was really easy. I love photography. So there was that connection that I wasn’t just sitting there like an idiot with bathing suits or lingerie or junior wardrobe or whatever. So that was kind of my waitressing job to allow me to pay for rent and acting classes. And then I was like, you know what? I think I really like it. It’s true. Just a piece of paper. And it’s funny, I love taking pictures. I love stopping life, but there was just, I guess more to me than just the piece of paper. So I guess that’s kind of how it happened.

Michael Jamin:
How did LA happen then?

Paula Marshall:
So I would audition test for a lot of things. I would fly to LA for different pilot projects. I would read in New York, and then most of the things were shooting in la, not New York at all back then. So I would fly to LA and I think it was just one of my agents said, look, Paul, if you really want to do this, you got to live in la,

Michael Jamin:
Right?

Paula Marshall:
I was like, ah, okay. So I moved to LA and yeah, and I was young and 20, I think I was 25 when I moved here, kind of old to kind of start, but I looked really young. And when you read for enough things and enough people are interested, the head of my agency said to me after a pilot, I, or I tested for something and I didn’t get it. And he told me back when we didn’t have computers, we had to go pick up our scripts and there would be a box outside the script, their office, after hours, he would look through and go, these are my scripts. In the middle envelopes, it says Paula Marshall on it. Anyway, I was kind of sad and I’m like, I don’t know. I’m not booking anything. And he goes, but you’re testing a lot. You’re very close. And I’m like, what does it take? What am I lacking? What am I missing that I’m not booking the thing? He goes, I believe in you and you need to keep doing this. And then I did. I slowly would start booking things.

Michael Jamin:
What were you lacking? Do you know?

Paula Marshall:
Maybe it was the confidence, maybe I was really nervous. I remember one time, I think it was during the Flash, it was a pilot called The Flash with John Wesley ship, and Amanda pays Amanda Paynes. Anyway, ended up booking it. But I remember in the audition room, I think it was at NBC or I don’t know, one of the big three, the scene, I put my hand on my knee and I was shaking so much from being nervous that I was like, oh, stop doing that. I don’t want them to know. I’m nervous because they want everyone to be fearless and confident.
And I get that because it takes a lot to go stand in front of a bunch of people and say stuff over and over, or stand there and be naked and do it over and over. There’s got to be part of you that’s kind of cocky and confident, and not that you think that you could do that over and over with someone else’s words. I mean, it’s kind of crazy that I do this, but I don’t know what tipped me over the scale. I never gave up. And I kept doing it and trying to figure it out and asking and asking the casting directors, and they always say nice things. They never say, well, you messed this thing. No, it’s just there’s a magic. If I don’t book something now, I don’t take it personally. Someone else just had a little bit more magic that day, and they tapped into the character and the writer saw that person that they wrote down and spent so many hours writing that Blonde Girl or Carla Gino just got it better than I did. Okay. I

Michael Jamin:
Know. To me, one of the hardest parts of acting, aside from the acting part is the fact that you really don’t, don’t have agency over your, you have to wait often. You have to wait. So what do you do in that time?

Paula Marshall:
Well, you find hobbies. I learned very early on to save money. You live under your means. So even if you get a gig and you’re the lead in a show, you’re making a lot of money per week. And like me, most of the shows, they did not go more than a season. So you have to take that and live under your means, and you can’t spend money and buy fancy things. I invested my money in my house, I think maybe three or four houses now. I try to invest my money and I fill my days with other things.

Michael Jamin:
Do you stress about it at all or no?

Paula Marshall:
Yeah. Yeah. I think in the beginning, early on I was very busy all the time. There wasn’t a lull. And when you do have a job on, if you’re a series regular on a show, you love your weekends, you love your time off. If you’re working crazy hours sitcom’s, not crazy hours, you know that those are

Michael Jamin:
Great for writers.

Paula Marshall:
I mean, yes, that’s true, but if you’re a director, Jimmy Burroughs would be like, I got a tea time at three 30. We got to get out of here. It’s a dream. And maybe that’s why I love the sitcom so much, because you got to to act and have a real life. When I had my daughter, I remember going, how would I be a mom and work on a single camera show? I would never see the kid. So when I was pregnant or when I read for Out of practice, I had just had my daughter a week before I went in to test for the show over at CBS. There was a script on my doorstep when I brought her up on the baby thing. And I’m like, I’m a mom and oh, right, I’m an actress and I’m 20 pounds overweight. And oh, I thought I was going to push the, I’m not going to work for a year button.
That was the plan. Then I saw the script and I read it and I’m like, oh man, it’s a sitcom. I’m not going to work very many hours. I’m going to work three weeks on one week off. I’m like, maybe I’ll just do it. Maybe I’ll just read for it and we’ll see. And I really liked it. I really liked the character. And then when I got it, I was like, oh shit, I don’t even have a nanny. How do I do this? So Danny went with me tape night. He was my nanny. I remember them going home because the baby, they were cool. Once we got picked up, they allowed me to have a little trailer outside for my nanny, Mariella and Maya, and I was breastfeeding at the time. She was just born. And it allowed me to do that. And I remember Henry, Henry Winkler still was like, how’s Maya? And it was just a great thing. I had my baby. You couldn’t ask for a better job for a mom. I was living my dream and I was having a baby when I was 40 years old.
Sitcom is the greatest thing in the world, and I’m still trying to get back on one. There’s just not that many of them now. It’s really sad. Multicam, I’ve written like three of them. Speaking of writing. Yeah, go on. The writer. So I remember, I think it was when the pilot that I did with John Corbett, when I cried 17 takes in a row, when that didn’t get picked up, I remember I was dropping off my daughter at elementary school and Dave Grohl, yes, that Dave Grohl sees me. And I had just found out that the pilot wasn’t picked up. It’s called Murder in the First, no, sorry, different thing called something different. That was another show that I did. But anyway, so Dave Girl’s like Paula Marshall, what’s up? You look sad. And I’m like, oh, another pilot wasn’t picked up. It just sucks.
And he goes, Paula, when either his studio or something, they didn’t like the music or whatever, and he goes, you know what? I did put his arm around me. We’re walking down that hallway. And he goes, I just did it myself. I got this set up and I just did it myself. And he goes, you should do it yourself. Why don’t you write something? And I’m like, yeah, why don’t I? And I’m like, well, because one, I’m not a writer, but he goes, who cares? So because of Dave Grohl, that opened the door to getting ideas out, writing something for me. One thing actually, I mean it went kind of far an idea went very far that I ended up producing with Paul Riser and Betsy Thomas wrote it. This was a little bit before, but it’s an outlet for me. I’m still not great at Final Draft. I’m still like, oh, how do I get the thing and the thing and the page? I can’t even figure it out half the time. So I’ve written a few sitcoms, mostly from my point of view, because I want the job, because I want

Michael Jamin:
To. So you wrote a single camera sitcom and then you showed it to Paul, and then

Paula Marshall:
What happened? The Paul and Betsy one, I met Paul’s, I believe his name was Alex, but I can’t really remember. I met this guy at a wedding and he was like, oh, you’re really funny and blah, blah, blah. I’m a big fan. I’m like, oh, that’s nice. Thank you very much. And he goes, do you have any ideas? Do you write? And I go, no, I don’t write. I go, I have this idea for a show. And he goes, really? Why don’t you come pitch it to me? And my partner? I’m like, great. Okay. He goes, Hollywood. I’m like, who’s your partner? He goes, who’s your partner? And he goes, Paul Riser. I’m like, what? Okay. So I literally got his number and I’m like, oh my God, I’m going to go meet with Paul Riser. I go meet with Paul Riser. I give him my pitch.
He really liked it. And he goes, I like it. I think let’s do it. Let’s work together. I was like, you couldn’t have given me anything that would’ve made me happier than the fact that Paul Riser liked an idea of mine. It’s almost like when I made Diane Keaton laugh in an audition. I literally called my agents and I was like, I’m good. I could die now. So the Paul Riser thing, it was just my idea. I had a lot of say. So I got to produce, I got to make a lot of decisions. It was probably one of the

Michael Jamin:
Greatest. So you shot it then.

Paula Marshall:
So we shot it and it wasn’t picked up, but

Michael Jamin:
You sold it to a studio.

Paula Marshall:
All of them wanted it. This is great. Everyone but Fox, wow.

Michael Jamin:
Wanted it. That’s amazing.

Paula Marshall:
It was crazy. But you have Paul Riser, I matter your stuff, but when you have someone like a Paul Riser or someone who is respected in Hollywood and has produced before, of course people are going to give them a shot,

Michael Jamin:
But not necessarily. I mean, they must’ve really liked it. So you wrote it and you started it?

Paula Marshall:
I started in it. It was my idea, but I did not write it. Later on, I ended up writing things and pitching, and a lot of people like my stuff, but I really mean should go out a little more aggressively than I do. But I have one right now that we’re kind of sending around me and my buddy Jeff Melnick, that he really likes this story. And it was, I won’t tell you what it is,

Michael Jamin:
But that’s not nothing. I mean, that’s a big achievement, honestly,

Paula Marshall:
For me. Yeah, I don’t write. I still am a terrible speller. I have a reading disorder. I’ve got this thing where reading is hard for me because the font and the text is very contrasty, so I’m a terrible speller. Thank God for spell check, because otherwise,

Michael Jamin:
Well, so you’re working on another piece for yourself as well then? Yes. I’m impressed.

Paula Marshall:
I have about three scripts that I’ve worked on here and there, and I remember I thought, oh, well, this is when I’m going to kill it. I’m going to knock these things out. I’m What happened with Covid? We were so scared. And my daughter was home going to now, whatever, ninth grade or 10th grade. And so it became, that whole time became about helping her find joy. I always said, every day, I’m going to help her get through this. And I really pushed all my stuff back. Any good mom does let everyone eat before you eat. Maybe the way I grew up. So I took care of her and all of that stuff before I focused on me. And then she went to college this year, and you would still think I’m like, Paula, I got to finish these things, which I did. I’m back. I’m back doing it, and I like it. I really like it. There’s something about the story, but no one ever taught me to write. So I’m writing from my experience, the years of reading sitcom scripts, I

Michael Jamin:
Have

Paula Marshall:
’em in my closet. I have almost every single script, especially the ones that I loved, and I go back to it and I refer back. I’m like, how did they do this? Even setting it up, I’ll go back and sneak a peek.

Michael Jamin:
That’s really smart. Was it hard for you when she left the house?

Paula Marshall:
Jesus. Oh, here’s the thing.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah, make up touching up

Paula Marshall:
Makeup break

Michael Jamin:
Last looks.

Paula Marshall:
I mean, because she’s not in Boston,
She’s down the road. It feels like if something bad happened, I could be there. I don’t have to get on a plane and only one direct flight. There’s one school in Connecticut that she got into, and it was a great school, and there’s one direct flight at 6:00 AM I’m like, this is never going to happen. And she chose, I was like, whatever you want, wherever you want to go to college, it’s your decision. I mean, I’ll tell you what I, but it’s all up to you. And she chose and it was something that’s not too far away. And it’s great. I get to see her and it’s worked out. It’s a win.

Michael Jamin:
What about the emptiness of the house? I’m going to make you cry now. That’s what I feel like. The house is so empty. You

Paula Marshall:
Know what? And I think though, Michael, I think if she was in anywhere else, I think if I couldn’t get to her, and that’s a weird thing as a mom, it’s about protecting your child. But yeah, I could cry when I think about certain things. Thanks, Michael. It’s about protecting them. And I think that the distance, because we are close, she’s still in. She’s still here. I don’t like cooking dinner as much. I’m sorry, Danny, because I don’t really have to. The big change is just her presence, her energy, the thought about, well, what’s Maya doing? Or what does she got to do? Now it’s not, and one of my scripts is, well, I’ll tell you one of my scripts is about what happens when your kid goes away to college? What happens to a woman?

Michael Jamin:
And go ahead. Can you tell me a little bit?

Paula Marshall:
So it started a while ago, just like my fear of who am I? What do I do? I mean, yes, I’m an actress, but then I pulled from that and I’m like, well, if I’m not an actress and I don’t have a job and everything has been bombed, there’s so many places to go. Okay, you’ve just got to, it’s like reinventing yourself, which almost every mom that I know who doesn’t have a job, it’s very true. I was so fortunate that I could have my cake, my baby, and also work. But a lot of parents, they go to jobs and then they come home and or they don’t work at all. And then it’s just mom, 100%. And they’re probably exhausted and happy. Some of my friends, I feel like they’re like, oh, I’m so glad. Finally I get to whatever. And either they’re retiring and they get to go travel, and I’m like, no, I’m an actor. I’m looking for a gig, whatever. I don’t think actors ever truly retire. I think we don’t do.

Michael Jamin:
I guess it depends on how much you love it and how much it must come on. It’s got a wear on you. The downs have to be, I don’t know.

Paula Marshall:
Well, I think probably just like a writer,
You have to be able to fill your day when you’re not going to be working and making money again. It’s why it’s smart to save your money and invest it and not buy that fricking mansion. If you got that check. Remember one time I went to the bank and I was depositing, it was before they had the picture phone deposits, a really big check. And it was the biggest check I think I’ve ever gotten. The first time I got that kind of money on a show and the teller, and again, I looked very young, the teller who didn’t look much older than me and took the check,
And he looked at the check and he looked at me and he goes, what do you do? What do you do? And I laughed. I go, I’m an actor. I go, but trust me, this thing, this isn’t forever. I know it’s not forever. So I have to live my life. It’s not forever. Because my goal is I never want to lose my house. I always want to be able to afford things. You hear these horror stories about these, you think you got it, and then it shows canceled, and then you can’t do that. I’ve always been kind of smart when it comes to money, but it’s hard. It’s really hard. We

Michael Jamin:
Spoke a little about this because your daughter’s interested in acting and you were, this is before we started taping, and what’s your advice for her?

Paula Marshall:
My advice is find a way to tap in and find the truth in anything. And if you can’t, then again, you substitute. If it’s not connecting, you got to figure out a way to connect to it. It’s about being truthful In imaginary circumstances, it’s really hard to walk into a room and pretend the thing and crying. You just really have to practice going there. I remember one time, and even in my life, life situations, I will take note of them. One time I was in San Francisco drunker than I’ve ever been before for whatever reason. And I remember the hotel I was, I think it was during Nash Bridges, and I was like, oh, I’m so wasted. I want to remember what I look like when I’m this wasted. So I, my, I guess I did have a cell phone then. So I took my cell phone or my camera, no cell phone, and I recorded myself being drunk.
And it’s like that one actor, he would always, Michael, he’s an English guy, Michael, I forget his name. He would be like, you can’t overdo the acting, but you’re trying not to be drunk. Yes. To try to make sure that the words are coming out. And so that’s what I did. I literally was like, this is me talking at my, it was the craziest thing. So in life, take advantage again, back to the advice to my daughter. Live these experiences and remember them. And if you cry, if you’re sensitive and emotional, fucking use it. There’s plenty of people who can’t cry at the drop of a hat. I can cry. You give me something to people always know Paula can cry in a scene and even if I don’t connect to it again, I substitute and I find a way. I’m an emotional person and the thing I think I have trouble doing is the angry part.
I’m not great at being super angry. I don’t think I play a lot of those roles like I was doing, I’ve worked with Steven Weber on his new Chicago Med. I was going to say new show, it is like year nine, but I play his ex-wife. I think it’s airing tomorrow as a matter of fact. And there was a scene where I had to come in and I’m yelling at him and I’m like, God, this is so not me. I’m not a yeller. I don’t yell even in the middle of a fight. If I’m fighting, I try to get it out and then I cry because I get frustrated because I can’t say, I’m not one of those bitchy women wives who are like, I’m just not. Anyway, back to the advice from my daughter, you take life’s experiences and you put a little marker on them and you remember them.
So when you need them, and I didn’t even think I was going to have any children because I started so late and as the actress in me, I just never thought, I dunno, mom and my mom material. I don’t know. I was like, you know what? I could really learn a lot as an actress by tapping into that love. I remember you’d see my friends who had kids way, way early and I’m like, God, they love these things. What did that feel like? I never knew what that was and so I took that experience and without it, I don’t think I would truly ever be able to play a mom as genuinely as I am. Love because man, I love my kid and I didn’t think I’d be like a great mom. I am the best mom I am and I love her and I love being a mom and all of it. So I tell my daughter to practice. Practice, learn your lines very easy and don’t go in if you’re not prepared. That’s kind of a big one. You’re not really,

Michael Jamin:
Just because you said mom was there, that fear the first time you decided to play mom, they say once you play mom like, oh, now she’s a mom.

Paula Marshall:
Well, it’s just an age thing, so that was never a thing for me. I’m going to play whatever I look like for sure. So I don’t care. I don’t care about that at all.

Michael Jamin:
Interesting. Paula, this has been such a great conversation, so thank you so much. You’re

Paula Marshall:
Welcome. I had so much fun talking with you.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah, I mean, I just love talking the craft with people like you. You’re a pro and you’re just, I don’t know, so much wisdom to share, so thank you so much. You’re

Paula Marshall:
Welcome.

Michael Jamin:
Thank you.

Paula Marshall:
I’m enjoying your Instagram posts.

Michael Jamin:
Oh, we’ll talk about that, but alright, well thank you. That’s it. That’s you’re released, but don’t go anywhere now we are going to talk some more here. Alright everyone, thank you so much. What a great conversation. Paul. Should they follow you somewhere? Did they do anything or just watch you on something? What do they want ’em to do?

Paula Marshall:
Depends on when you get this.

Michael Jamin:
Venmo you the most. What do you want? Venmo? Me

Paula Marshall:
Cash is great. I mean, my Instagram is the Paula Marshall. I guess I’m not really great at all that stuff.

Michael Jamin:
Are you supposed to be though? Do your agents tell you?

Paula Marshall:
No, agents don’t. But if you have so many followers, then it used to be this thing called a TV Q, which is your TV quotes, how many people know who you are? And that’s just, social media has kind of taken that over, really. So people, I think people care how many followers you have. I do not

Michael Jamin:
Again, but Tbq is not a thing anymore, you’re saying?

Paula Marshall:
I don’t think it is. Wow. No. I mean maybe they call it something else, but I know an actress friend of mine was early on in the Instagram thing. She’s like, yeah, I got to join Instagram. Yuck. I’m like, yeah, the thing. She’s like, I was told I have to have it and you got to pitch. I’m not that self-promoting and I’ll say things that are inappropriate and crude and get kicked off of Twitter for it, but whatever. That’s who I’m,

Michael Jamin:
Thank you again. Really, it was such an honor to have you on. Alright everyone, more conversations coming. Thank you so much for tuning in. Until next week, keep creating. You’re an actor. Tell your friends about this. You’re other actor friends. Alright, everyone, thanks so much.
Wow. I did it again. Another fantastic episode of What the Hell is Michael Jamon talking about? How do I do it week after week? Well, I don’t do it with advertiser supported money. I tell you how I do it. I do it with my book. If you’d like to support the show, if you’d like to support me, go check out my new book, A Paper Orchestra. It asks the question, what if it’s the smallest, almost forgotten moments that are the ones that shape us most. Laura Sanoma says, good storytelling also leads us to ourselves, our memories, our beliefs, personal and powerful. I loved the Journey and Max Munic, who was on my show says, as the father of daughters, I found Michael’s understanding of parenting and the human condition to be spot on. This book is a fantastic read. Go check it out for yourself. Go to michael jamin.com/book. Thank you all and stay tuned. More. Great stuff coming next week.

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Michael Jamin, Showrunner, TV Writer, Author

Michael Jamin

For the past 26 years, Michael Jamin has been a professional television writer/showrunner. His credits include King of the Hill, Beavis & Butthead, Wilfred, Maron, Just Shoot Me, Rules of Engagement, Brickleberry, Tacoma FD and many more.

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