https://youtu.be/ydlgmfmogIg?feature=shared

This week, Michael Jamin interviews Writer/Producer Christy Stratton about her career in Hollywood. Christy Stratton has worked on shows like The Amanda Show, King of the Hill, Modern Family, and Bless The Harts.

Show Notes

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Autogenerated Transcript

Christy Stratton:
Story has become so unimportant, I’m guessing to, to buyers or something. I don’t know why, but it is like, story was so important to us coming up and how much time you devoted to it, that it’s surprising to me when, you know, people don’t know it. I mean, again, it took me forever, but when it’s so important and I feel like, um, it’s kind of a lost art…

Michael Jamin:
You’re listening to Screenwriters. Need to Hear This with Michael Jamin. Hey everyone, this is Michael Jamin and you’re listening to Screenwriters Need to Hear This, the podcast. My co-host Phil is not here today. He’s working on the back end of the course. He’s making it better. That’s what I’m told. But I’m here with my very special guest, Christy Stratton. She’s a great friend and thank you Christy, thank you for joining the show. I’m hop

Christy Stratton:
You, I’m, so any, any chance I can get to, to have a chat with you is, is, um, it’s exciting, really.

Michael Jamin:
Let tell you something, Christy, I’m

Christy Stratton:
This big star.

Michael Jamin:
My audience does not deserve you. You’re too good for the people

Christy Stratton:
<laugh>. Oh,

Michael Jamin:
But let me tell you, let me tell them, Let me give you a little intro. Let me give them an introduction so they know who you are. Okay? So, uh, TV writer and producer, uh, I’m gonna just run through some of your credits. I met you on King of the Hill. We were together for many years, but before that you did Hope and Faith. Remember that show? I remember it awkward. You were on a, you were on Awkward for, for a long time. Every Everyone’s crazy but us, which was your own minute web series, right? Yes. Which you also directed. Correct. Uh, then Modern Family, we’ve both heard of that show. Bless the hearts. You’ve worked on that for, for quite a while. You also did Hope in Faith. You like chose, uh, you like No, you, I’m sorry. Raising Hope you like shows with the word hope in it.

Christy Stratton:
I, what can I say that is just, that’s a theme that I

Michael Jamin:
<laugh> and so I got many questions for you, but I know some of the answers. But these people listening, they don’t know anything. So tell me, tell everyone how you’ve broke into the business.

Christy Stratton:
Oh, it’s so, you know, it, it was such a, a backwards kind of way. I’m from Texas, right? And I went to college in Florida and I, I, the Universal Studios Orlando had just opened when I graduated from college. So like, that was Hollywood’s me, that was showbiz, right? And so I worked as a pa and um, one of the PAs that I work with said, Oh, there’s this thing called the DGA Trainee test. Do you know what this is?

Michael Jamin:
I didn’t know what it is. Yeah,

Christy Stratton:
Well, what it is, is it’s a test that they, I think they still have DGA trainees on, on sets, and they will put you, if you like, are selected. They put you on sets and that you can be a pa. So, which is, I didn’t end up passing or getting, uh, to be a DGA trainee, but it brought me out here and I was kind of like, like, I, I really don’t know what it is I want, but it’s not, you know, in Orlando, Florida. So I,

Michael Jamin:
But you didn’t know if you wanted to be a writer or director. You just wanted to

Christy Stratton:
Be, I couldn’t even imagine being a writer. Like, I couldn’t even, Ima I wouldn’t even dream of doing anything like that. Never.

Michael Jamin:
But then what did you wanna do?

Christy Stratton:
Well, I just wanted to kind of work in entertainment. Well, that’s the thing is like, I, when I got out here, I started working at a PR firm and I’m like, Okay, PR that’s not what I’m, you know, that’s not my, you know, nothing against that. But I just wasn’t good at that. Right? And, um, and then I worked, oh gosh, I did a bunch of temp jobs, but then I got, uh, I heard about the Groundlings School and the Groundlings is an LA based comedy troupe and a lot of very famous Saturday Night Live people came from it. And they had a, uh, series of classes that you can take. And I wasn’t terribly successful with that either, but it was like, Oh, I’m enjoying, um, writing. And, and, and so it took many years to get to that point. And I did not get through to the Groundlings, but I went to this other theater called Acme Comedy Theater. Right. And some of the people there, Brett Bear and David Fikel were there, Alex Boorstein, some people were there that were doing, that were writing scripts. And so I thought, well, I, I, I’ll, I’ll try that. And so I, then I wrote a couple different ones and I got into the Warner Brothers TV writers program.

Michael Jamin:
You did that. Wait, hold on. Slow down. Yes. Like, first of all this, no one was gonna want, no one wants to hear the answer to this, but me. But what part of town did you live in when you first came to la?

Christy Stratton:
Oh gosh. I li well, I li because I was a PA in Florida, one of the gals had already moved out here, so I kind of was her roommate in, uh, in Santa Monica. But then I lived in this tiny little room that I lived with somebody else in Sherman Oaks. Right. Shared the bath. I shared a bathroom with a cat, <laugh>. And I can remember like walking in on the cat doing his business and being like, Oh, sorry, I’ll come back, <laugh>. It was really, um, and I didn’t, for myself, it was just rough. And, and I, it, one of my biggest regrets, and I don’t have many, is that I didn’t take typing in, in high school. Right? Because you get all the top temp jobs if you can type fast. And I never could, but anywho. But yeah, I lived all over in just tiny. And then I lived in West Hollywood in a bachelor apartment that did not have a kitchen. It had, um, uh, uh, hot plate and a mini fridge. And so if I wanted to, What

Michael Jamin:
Street was this on West Hollywood? Cause I lived in West Hollywood too.

Christy Stratton:
On Melrose.

Michael Jamin:
What? Melrose and what?

Christy Stratton:
Oh God, you don’t Melrose. Um, where Mellon Rose’s is, Oh gosh. What is, Uh, Kings.

Michael Jamin:
Kings. Oh, okay. You’re further west. Okay. Yeah.

Christy Stratton:
Yeah. Interesting. And I would use the toilet as my garbage disposal. Like, it was, it was really meager.

Michael Jamin:
You paid your dues. And then I didn’t realize you were in the, Cause we were in the Water Brothers Spreaders program too. Oh, I didn’t realize that. But what, I don’t know what year we were in. I wonder if you were before or after us.

Christy Stratton:
I’m sure I was after.

Michael Jamin:
Do you <laugh>, how dare you. How dare you imply Oh

Christy Stratton:
No, But you were already a producer When I would say when I was a

Michael Jamin:
Did you, did you enjoy, did you enjoy it? Did you like,

Christy Stratton:
Um, I did because it was the first time if all the things I tried and I tried stand up, I tried, Oh my goodness. I tried everything and it was the only thing that I felt positive feedback coming back to me. And it was. And so I think all of those years of trying to do all those other things in comedy, trying to figure it out, um, helped. And, uh, and so I just, and I lucked out that I was one of the ones that was read at the end. So my first job interview as a writer was for friends, and I did not get it.

Michael Jamin:
Wow. Must have been a good script. And you ever wrote with anybody, you’ve never collaborated with anybody, Right?

Christy Stratton:
Consider that. You know, I, like I did, I did actually. In fact, it’s funny, I’m about to go out with a pitch with a person that I used to write with. I did for a while. I wrote a couple with my friend Dave. But, um, but I, you know, I don’t know that I found that other person that it, that, that it worked out. Cuz you have to have that kind of equal amount of work and your work ethic has to be the same. And you’re, and, and I, I don’t know, I guess I never found that, that person and that, cuz that would’ve been helpful. And I, you know, I love collaborating and, and that kind of stuff

Michael Jamin:
Now. So you got outta the Warner Brothers, but people don’t know this. When you’re in the Warner Brothers workshop and you graduate, especially, you were like, probably the top of the class. They try to set you up. They try to pimp you out to one of those shows at a discount rate. They probably about a third of what the Writer’s Guild minimum is. But you’re okay at that point. You’re so desperate. You’ll do it cuz whatever. Right? Yeah. And they, they got you meeting with friends, which is amazing. I’m

Christy Stratton:
At it. I did not get the job. Which, which honestly my learning curve was very, you know, slow and long. And I, I didn’t have any, like, I knew what I thought was funny and I have a background that’s very unique to a lot of people that are out here, but it took years for me. And so if I’d had gotten on that show, I don’t, I don’t know that I would’ve lasted. I mean it, like, it was the end. I mean, it was, I think it was the last season, but, Oh, okay. But I mean, it, I would’ve been grateful for the opportunity, but I don’t know that I would’ve been, um, a lot of those lessons I had to learn. I’m glad I learned them. Um, on, on, I don’t know, not so big a stage, I guess.

Michael Jamin:
Well, were you crushed when you didn’t get it though?

Christy Stratton:
That’s a good question. I was bummed.

Michael Jamin:
How could you not be?

Christy Stratton:
I was bummed, but I was a little bit relieved.

Michael Jamin:
And then at that point you had an agent, right?

Christy Stratton:
I had imagine going into the, going into those

Michael Jamin:
Program. That’s pretty impressive that you got in any the, the program. I mean, it’s hard to get in. Okay. So then what happened after they, you got submitted to other shows?

Christy Stratton:
So then, um, Yes, and I, that’s when I got on Three Sisters and I, I was, I was useless. I cannot overstate,

Michael Jamin:
I never even heard of Three Sisters. What was that? I was a

Christy Stratton:
Wonderful show. Diane Cannon and, um, uh, AJ Langer Uhhuh and, um, Katherine Lea.

Michael Jamin:
And is

Christy Stratton:
It, And the gal who redhead that was played, um, Beth on News Radio. And I always forget her name. She did in Nty.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah. Right. I know who you. Right. And so,

Christy Stratton:
But I got on that show when I was, I was like, I say useless.

Michael Jamin:
People don’t realize that. People don’t realize this is all good cuz people don’t realize that your first job, you’re going to be useless. Most writers are gonna be useless. Did you recognize they were useless? Cuz sometimes young writers don’t show, they don’t realize they’re useless and they talk anyway.

Christy Stratton:
They don’t nowadays. It’s that. But back then we, I was the only staff writer in the room. Now it’s, it’s all staff writers, Right? And like one senior person. Right. But back then it was very clear and the two story editors, they were like fed for yourself. I mean, and I can remember like, um, uh, pitching, it was finally my episode. I finally got an episode to write, and it was only in the back nine. And, uh, it was a disaster. It was awful. Right? And I, I wanted to punch, It was punch up time, but I wasn’t very good at that. Like, now I love it and I have so much fun doing it, but back then, but I knew it at staying. So I, I pitched a joke that was like the, it, the punchline was like, it’s good because of this and bad because of this.

Christy Stratton:
And the showrunner said, I don’t get it. And I’m like, Oh, okay. And I tried to let it go, you know? Cause I wanted to try to see if I could get the room to kind of, you know, help me out here. Right? Um, and then she goes, No, no, no. Explain it to me. So I’m like, and then I like, as a tear rolls down. Yes. And I explain. And then she goes, Well that sounds like it’s both good. And I just was like, Okay, you know, don’t cry out loud. I’m just trying to just honestly like, hurt myself a little bit so I could my energies. But I, it, it wasn’t because I was doing what I thought was good work and being unrecognized. It was, I didn’t know what I was doing and no one helped me.

Michael Jamin:
<laugh>. Yes. Yes. That’s, it’s such a, Okay. Cause I talk about that a lot. I, Okay, so then you, okay, you were

Christy Stratton:
Then I lucked out sometimes because I’ve been, been doing this so long and I had been here so long up to that point, you know, people, so, like for instance, um, uh, when I needed a new agent, uh, my friend John Westfall, who I did a a Groundlings class with, said, Hey, there were, he’s at Sony. There was some agents in my office and I recommended you. And so I got with them and um, by sheer luck one of the guys, David Shane, who is still like, I will never, he’s paid me a kindness that I will never be able to repay. So three sisters was a nightmare. Then David Shane, this guy who was in the Warner Brothers program with me, uh, had a meeting with Greg Daniels because Greg’s or Dave’s brother was like roommates with, with Greg Daniels or something in college, I’m not sure. Right. But Greg testing him, said, uh, to David, uh, who was the best person in your, in your Warner Brother’s thing, seeing if he would say himself. He, Cause he told me this later and he, and he went, and then he said me and then he is like, she’s from Texas. Cause it was the king of the hill. It was was good. Yeah. And so then, uh, it turned into like, who was this girl? And so then I got a, a meeting with Greg because of David’s

Michael Jamin:
I’s, see, that’s nice. And so you fit in really what cuz King of the Hill obviously was took place in Texas. So they always were looking for more authenticity. They’re looking for, they’re always looking for writers from Texas. And so you jumped in, I think season six, Is that right?

Christy Stratton:
Or seven or seven? It was a, like, there were two other women, and I wanna say 15 men. Yeah. And I have to say everyone was so, uh, because I have been on stats where I’ve been treated very poorly. But it was all you guys, I mean, it wasn’t like every, I just became the little sister. Like I became, and, and, and in a way that was, um, with kindness, but not inappropriate. You know what I’m saying? Like, I, I felt like I was out, I was on my own for a while. Like, I’m just this in the sea. And I, I can remember pitching a little bit here and there, and I can remember you, uh, being very kind to me and telling me, um, that when pitching a joke, you know, don’t go to that obvious place cuz everyone’s gonna beat you. And you’re right, I’m not fast. I’m not fast. And that you said, go to a place where no one else is gonna go. And so that is what I have done my whole career, because I am not that, and all you guys, all you guys could just do this so quickly and I can like, come up with ideas quickly. Like, ooh, what if this character, you know, is this or that the other thing. But I can’t, the joke in forming it and having that punchline, you guys could all

Michael Jamin:
Do that. But, you know, Christy, that wasn’t that advice. I struggled the same way I got that advice from Marsh McCall on just shoot me. So I was the same as you. I mean, we’re all the same way. So Yeah.

Christy Stratton:
Yeah. But that was a really good place because that show had such great characters and everyone was super smart. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, I got to kind of learn on the job in a way that, I mean, yes, I always felt like I was gonna be fired. And <laugh>, I mean, I think I almost was at a point, but, but it was, I got to really learn from the best learn how to craft story because story was everything. And I don’t know, I mean, you remember, we would spend weeks just freaking story and, um, that process and then you would kind of produce your episodes. Right. And that was really important to me at that time. And Garland Tesa, who I really learned a lot from. Yeah, great.

Christy Stratton:
The sea of, you know, Princeton Harbor, all of these people. And what I loved about Garland was she would, if someone made a reference to something that she didn’t know, she would say, What does that mean? Or like, what, what, And I can remember like, Oh, that shows power when you admit to something you don’t know. Right. And I, so I always did that. I always, Oh, I don’t, what is that? Is that a And because I’m, it shows a lack of insecurity, I guess. Yes. And also there would be times when we would come back from an, an animatic and John Al Schuler would be like, Who, why did the an mades do this and that? And I knew it was because of something I said. And so I’d be like, Oh, sorry I, that was me. I thought that this would blah, blah, blah. And it would just a few, when you admit your mistakes, when you admit what you don’t know, it diffuses things right away. It, to me is kind of a show of, of power, uh, in my opinion. And I love, that’s good advice her because she was in the sea of, you know, all of these for a long time before, you know, I came along and, and whatnot. But

Michael Jamin:
She would always go. And I tried to have, I, she would always go like almost into a panic when it was time for her to write her script. And I, I don’t know what I’m doing in Mc Garland, You’re probably the best writer here. <laugh>. She’s so good. But she, but she had this, she had some of these insecurities as wells. Like I got nothing. And she’d come up with some great line or great scene. Um, yeah.

Christy Stratton:
Real good character stuff. Yeah. It was a good, like, I really, I, it was just such a funny group and boy, some lines and that characters were great. And, and even though every year I was like, I’m not coming back. Right. I would come back and I’m so grateful because I learned so much.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah. And you were there for a long time. And then, and then what came, what? And then the show was canceled and then what happened? What did you do after that?

Christy Stratton:
Well, remember it went down in the middle and that’s when I did Hope and Faith in New York. So, Oh, I, they staffed out of LA and, but then it shot in New York. And to be able to be paid to write in New York City and be, you know, on my own and, and live in Tribeca, that opportunity, I, I’m so grateful for. Cause I’ll never forget, I went, I was, that was my biggest year in interviews. I went out for a boy a bunch. I went a a, a bunch and I got one offer and that was to move to New York City, <laugh> and, and do that show. And I, I had the time in my life.

Michael Jamin:
That’s another thing people don’t realize cuz they say, you know, do I have to move to Hollywood to work in Hollywood? Because they, they mention shows like that, that I’ve shot in New York. And I always say, But all the staffing is done in la They hire the LA writers and they fly him out there.

Christy Stratton:
Yeah. You know? Yeah. Mark Driscoll was out of New York, but they already knew him. Like, in other words, it wasn’t like they did any, they just knew he was out there. So they staffed him. But, uh, yeah, no, you gotta be, you’re absolutely right.

Michael Jamin:
And then in between all this, you’ve saw a bunch of pilots and stuff.

Christy Stratton:
Yes. Yeah. I’ve done pilots. And you know what, you say something and you said something to me then I think, but you hit this on your, uh, stuff too. My mistake is that I always would come up with pilots based on the stories that I wanted to tell. Right. I have this very, um, difficult relationship with my mother, or ooh, I, um, have this interesting relationship with my husband or I, or I get so excited and I can usually get a producer and a studio excited as well. But once you get to that buyer, if they’re not buying that kind of show, I mean, they’re, you’re just, you wasted your time. There was one time I, when I did my web that turned out to be my web series. I pitched it as a show with, um, David Janari and NBC U and we went to NBC and I mean, the laughs were so much that I had to hold for laughs, which that doesn’t happen to me all the time.

Christy Stratton:
I’m not this person that can just go into a room and just make everyone go fall. But I didn’t that day. And I had a meeting with one of the gals later, one of the execs that was in the room, and she’s like, Oh, it was late and, or it was kind of late in the year. And so we didn’t have a lot of, you know, money left over. And she goes, It was one of the three pitches I heard all season that made me cry laughing, but it didn’t. Wow. In fact, they spent a million dollars on it, bewitched. That never happened. Yeah.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah. So people don’t realize that as well. Sometimes. Yeah. Sometimes about selling it at the right time of the year. If it’s lit too late in the year, they’re outta money. They’ve already bought something like it. There’s a million reasons for them say no. You’re getting them say yes is much harder. And,

Christy Stratton:
And honestly, all the passion in the world, all the connection in the world, all of that does not matter if it’s not something that they are in the market

Michael Jamin:
For. Well then, then how do you go about developing shows now?

Christy Stratton:
Gosh. Well, <laugh>, I really haven’t taken my own advice. Um, a friend came to me with an idea and I’m like, this is great. And I wanna to, I wanna get back to broadcast because having been, uh, you do streamer stuff. I mean, there was this thing that I supervised that we sold in October of 2019, and they only passed this past January or February because the streamers make you do a second script, then they do a mini room where at that great deal that you made right on your, they’re not gonna pay you that. They’re gonna pay you a minimum. And just the number of weeks that you’re working, not the three months of prep you’re doing mm-hmm. <affirmative>, you get throw dollars for that, then you know, they’re gonna sit on that for six more months. Right. And then you’ll decide. And um, so after that, and because I think broadcast, there’s a lot of broadcast comedies that I am loving. And so I’m like, you know what?

Michael Jamin:
There aren’t, there aren’t a lot of broadcast comedies. There’s just not

Christy Stratton:
Well, but there are more now that I love than there have been in years past. Okay.

Michael Jamin:
So what do you, what do you loving on what comedies you like and then

Christy Stratton:
Broadcast? Oh my God, I love those. That ghosts, I love Abid Elementary. I loved pivoting my friend Liz Astro. Right. Uh, that show was great. And those shows just give me hope that like, oh, you know, you can do some really cool, fun stuff. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, um, on broadcast. Cuz I’m, I’m done with like the, I just don’t wanna cringe. I’m done cringing. You’re done cringing. I wanna laugh. I wanna laugh. I wanna see, you know, relatable, interesting stories that are funny that I can just turn on and be like, Oh my gosh, this like, I, you know how when you really love a show, you can’t tell what episodes are good or bad. Like you just love it. You wanna go into that world curb, I thought was, I know that’s not broadcast, but I did love that this year. Um, uh, but I just, sometimes I just wanna, I just wanna laugh. I don’t need to cringe anymore.

Michael Jamin:
Well, you’re well time’s running out for you to pitch network, uh, you know, isn’t,

Christy Stratton:
We’re going right in, we’re literally meeting this guy who we’re going right into the networks with no producer, no nothing. Because my agency got bought out by another agency. So now I’m with that agency and I switched managers because my other agent became a manager. So that all took some,

Michael Jamin:
And so they said, fine, we’ll take it. Right. They, they managed, because sometimes you can’t even do that. You pitch it right to this network, which is unusual. Are you going,

Christy Stratton:
I’m in a couple weeks. Yeah, we’ll see

Michael Jamin:
<laugh>, because most of the time, and so how that usually works is if the network buys it and we don’t, there’s like no right way of doing this, the network will buy it and if they want it, then they’ll dump it off the offload and onto their sister branch, whatever studio that they own or what, you know, they’re affiliated with. I mean, I guess that’s how, that’s how you plan to do it. Uh, to me that makes more sense, but I don’t know why. The other way, usually you pitch to a studio and then the studio pitches in the network. I dunno why

Christy Stratton:
That is. Also, you gotta have that producer and all that takes so much time. And we were ready in July to start talking to people, but wow. We were told that like, oh no one’s around in August, everyone is traveling. And I’m like, Ugh, okay. So then time just passed. And so once the dust settled and I’m, you know, with my agents and with my manager, they’re like, You don’t have time to, you know, or we did go to a couple producers and uh, uh, that were not interested.

Michael Jamin:
There were, Yeah, it’s hard to even, it’s hard to get. So as I say, it’s the more pieces that you can put together. If you can get a producer attached then, or, and then then later a studio, you’re walking in with more pieces. It helps to make, sell the show, but it’s not necessary. But it can help sometimes <laugh>, it depends where their deal is at.

Christy Stratton:
Uh, it’s just kinda like, I’m gonna give this a go. This, I’m gonna give it a go. I’m gonna give it a go. And, and I actually have so many pieces of development that are just sitting waiting. Right. I have a script that, um, I have, there was a company called, um, Global Road that went bankrupt. So I wrote a script for them and now we’ve got the rights back and we actually have a piece of talent attached. But you know, now with a specs script, you’ve gotta have a director. You have to not just have the supporting actor but a lead actor. Like, you have to, you have to do everyone’s job for them. So they’re right. I have two pieces of, to fully written pilots sitting and waiting,

Michael Jamin:
Because usually it’s very hard and Mark experience, it’s very hard to get talent attached unless you’re developing it for them. You know, like I, we’ve done it with comedians will develop show four comedian. But other than that, it’s hard to get our experience hard. It’s hard to get meaningful at talent attached, meaning talent that will move the needle. Some people say, Well, you know, my friend’s, an actor doesn’t, not your friend. We need someone famous <laugh>. You know? Um, interesting. And so how, what is your day like even when you’re not, what is your day? Like what narrowly when you’re not on staff, what do you usually do? How, what’s your writing schedule?

Christy Stratton:
Um, when, Well, I’ll either work out or I’ll get it. My, I do my puzzles. I do all my puzzles. I do like six puzzles.

Michael Jamin:
Like your, like crossword puzzles?

Christy Stratton:
Yeah. Well, I do crossword, I do the, I do the letter box. I do the wordle, I do the portal.

Michael Jamin:
What about word jumble? Are you good at the word jumble? You know, the kind that you find at the menus that like the ground round. Can you do that?

Christy Stratton:
<laugh>? No.

Michael Jamin:
<laugh>, you know, hot dog and you others hot dog. I found it

Christy Stratton:
<laugh>. But I will do anything to delay it, to delay writing. But I, I, there’s, I’m never, there’s never not, there’s never a time where I’m not working on something. Even the, even the specs that I are ready that have a, like, I have one that’s got a director attaching two producers. I’m not done. Like I will look at it again or I will Ooh. Right. In fact, I got, I was inspired because of one of your things. You said something, it was about a moment landing. Right. And there was a moment in my, one of my scripts that I’m like, Oh, that I just kind of glossed over that. And so I took a minute and I figured out how to make it land. And then I’m like, Hey, you know, here’s the new draft of this. Um, but I, so I will, I will then try to have some time to myself and um, and I’m kind of like, I’ll write a little bit and if I’ve come up up with something good, I’ll reward myself by like doing some, you know, web surfing.

Christy Stratton:
I don’t like, I’m not this person that says I’m gonna work from this time to this time. I’m the best when I’m like doing something else. And then, ooh, that’s how I sold that problem. Right, right. You’re not thinking about it. I’ll do a I’ll, I’ll have a project and I’ll like a painting or something. Not, not like a painting, but like painting a wall. And I will be like, Ooh, this is how I can, you know, I can solve that. Now sometimes it’s like, what am I, I have a 13 year old. So like, okay, what a, what are we gonna do for dinner? Cuz my husband bless his heart, does the football, the baseball, all of that.

Michael Jamin:
He’s useless in the kitchen.

Christy Stratton:
<laugh>, he’s really not. Oh, ok. He’s great. But, but meaning like, you know, I will, there’s a lot of those things that fill my day too. And, but I’m not this person that just sits right and works. I just, I, I’m just not

Michael Jamin:
Now I’m, I’m jumping around, but then I’m gonna sound like an old foy, but how do you feel like writer’s rooms have changed since you first got broken?

Christy Stratton:
Oh, well, they’ve changed a lot. A lot. I will say. I think it’s good that like, when I came in as like either the only woman or the only low level writer, it took me a long time to do, get, do anything. Whereas nowadays, because they have, they come in with a lot more confidence. Um, I find and, and, and not, I’m not saying that, oh, everyone just is so confident. I’m not saying that. I’m saying that I feel like people can get it quicker because they’re more of them and they have more support with between each other. Do you

Michael Jamin:
Think they get it quicker? Cause I’m not, that’s not how I see it. I see it, it is really, they haven’t gotten it quicker, but they’re just talking anyway, <laugh>, because there’s so much to, they have to learn. You know, It takes so much to learn. Like the first, even my, all of our careers, the first couple years, like you’re saying, you’re kind of useless and you’re, it’s not that people are shutting you up. It’s, it’s more, it’s more like you don’t know how to contribute.

Christy Stratton:
No. <laugh> no. And, and bec it’s very interesting too, as you know, there’s a lot that, like, I never had anyone, my God, how do I say this? And there’s a lot that you can’t say. And I don’t wanna, I don’t wanna be, you know, it’s just, you have to kind of make it used to be writer’s rooms. You could say anything, have any kind of discussion. Mm-hmm. <affirmative> have any kind of, uh, uh, thing. And you can’t really do that anymore. And, and for some good, good reasons and some, you know, I, I’m not, I’m not trying to, I mean, I’m glad that people aren’t treated poorly anymore. I think that is, you know, um, I’m trying to get out sun here. Uh, that’s good. Um, that, so that is a little bit, and you’re, you know, I worked for someone recently, a dear friend who, cuz you gotta watch what you say because what if someone takes it the wrong way and, you know, puts it on Twitter.

Christy Stratton:
So, um, that’s different. You know, that’s different for better or for worse. And I’m not, I, I don’t wanna, but Right. That’s certainly different. Like there was a code, uh, in the writer’s room. There was a code that you kept it, you, you kept everything in there unless you were, you know, sharing something with your spouse, <laugh>. But, um, yeah. So that’s, that’s, yeah. Certainly different. And story has become so unimportant, I’m guessing to, to buyers or something. I don’t know why, but it is like, story was so important to us coming up. And how much time you devoted to it? That it’s surprising to me when, you know, people don’t know it. I mean, again, it took me forever, but when it’s so important and I feel like, um, it’s kind of a lost heart <laugh>. And I, I don’t know. I don’t know. So I, I, and it’s, yeah.

Michael Jamin:
So as a senior writer in the room, you’re based, you feel like you’re carrying a lot of the weight.

Christy Stratton:
Absolutely. Right. Absolutely. Sorry, I’m leaning down here. Um, and Yes. Yeah. Yes. And, and then look. Yeah.

Michael Jamin:
So what would you tell, what would you tell new writers or aspiring writers? What kind of advice would you give them?

Christy Stratton:
Gosh. Watch a lot of tv. Watch a lot of tv. Watch it kind of, um, like what I do with my son is I’ll be like, Ooh, is this the, is this the midpoint? And I’ll, I’ll pause it. Or I’ll be like, well, like if we’re watching a movie, like, do you think that’s an always lost? Do you think that’s right? Like, just to, just to, I mean, not that I don’t know that he would ever wanna be a writer, but just to kind of get into the rhythms because it’s just, it’s rhythm and surprise and, and it’s just so hard because it’s like, it’s all trial and error. It’s so all trial and error. And, and I would say to young writers just to, to write and, and see what sticks. Do your funny tweets stick? Do you know the, the essays you write, Does that stick? Just like, where, what is sticking?

Michael Jamin:
And, and how do you feel people are breaking in today?

Christy Stratton:
I really don’t know. That’s a good question. Cause I’m thinking of like, who are the young writers that we had on the flats? Which was that, which was the, um, the show that didn’t go forward? Um, we, I, one came from my manager. We, it would come from friends. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. Um, I’m trying to think if, if there’s anyone that completely we didn’t know. And that was maybe at the upper levels because then you read the little blurb. And I, you know, I wouldn’t, especially with the younger writers, I don’t read past 10 pages. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, why not? Because they’re terrible. Right? I’m sorry. Right. Young writers cannot write pilots. Don’t put someone on the toilet on page one. Don’t have anyone having sex in that first 10 pages. I will. I’m done. That’s not to me, um, people talking in a coffee shop, it’s, if it’s about dating, I’m like, But this one young writer, uh, who I knew, which is, that’s how she came to us, But it was like a comedy about, um, like a Titanic, like Ship Captain Uhhuh.

Christy Stratton:
But he was inept and it was told back in that time. And of course I read somebody, I’m like, Yes. Like, this person is funny. And you’d think, and I don’t know how you are, but I, I always thought that, Oh, I wanna see if they can, if it’s a high school show, you know, I want a high school sample, but I just want funny and good ideas. And the, the, the story editor we hired, would you, uh, uh, had on your staff Chandra Chandra? Yeah. Yes. Her first pages, I don’t know if you read, but her first pages were a woman giving birth. Okay. And it’s going through like, oh, it’s, it’s very dramatic. And then the baby drops on the floor. What? Or something like that. You realize that they, she’s an actress and she is helping out at a, um, at a hospital where they pretend to have these procedures and that’s her job.

Christy Stratton:
And I’m like, that, that was enough for me to give her meaning, because I thought that’s a fun surprise. I did not expect it. It was different. Uh, you know, it looked that she could put a script together, you know, And, uh, and so that, that, But I won’t reest 10 pages cuz they’re not good. But here’s what I wanna say to young writers. Yeah. It, everyone is not good. No one comes out good out of the gate. No one, I mean, I don’t wanna say no one, but I, I I, I just be, don’t be so don’t be hard on yourself. Know it. And just keep writing. Cuz every time you do something, you will get better. I look back even on the stuff I did four or five years ago, and I’m like, Oh, I, you know, I, I, because you’re the farther up you go and the more you have to lead people and get things out of them Yeah.

Christy Stratton:
That you just get better and faster. And I will say, like, I, it’s very hard when someone pitched, like, I’m trying to be the person who entertains every pitch. But when, you know, because of your experience where that pitch is gonna end, uh, like in other words, you can see mm-hmm. <affirmative> because your experience and, but you don’t wanna cut that person off. So I’ll just, you know, I’ll try to follow things down and like, and then once it gets there, then we move. So <laugh>, I dunno, that was apo of nothing, but, um, uh, uh, yeah, I would say for young people, just put, get a camera out, shoot stuff. Doing my web series, um mm-hmm. <affirmative> Imy nominated and what be nominated web series than I shot. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. Um, it, it, I learned a lot. You learn about how, like, I wanna be quick because I don’t wanna take people’s time on the internet.

Christy Stratton:
So how do I make these turns? How do I do that quickly? How do I, um, I it still needs an ending here. How do I do that? And you have whatever, five minutes or less, Right? Um, but I would just tell young writers to listen to people like you, like keep listening and learning and getting, you know, and have people read your scripts. Not, you know, I mean, your friends, have them read it, see what works, see what doesn’t, and then just keep doing it and keep finding things that inspire you. Because even though, like I say, I complain that <laugh>, like I’m never, it’s never the thing that they want when I wanna give it to them. That said, I’ve worked pretty steadily for 20 years, Right? And that is because I do write things that are my story and I know how to, I know how to craft and I can do all that. And they, people can read a sample or, you know, uh, uh, oh, can you attach to, to do the, you know, supervise this, blah, blah, blah. So it, it’s benefited me in some ways that I do that. However, I certainly would love to have that magic thing that says, Oh, hey, this is what Fox wants this week.

Michael Jamin:
That, that’s one thing I say to young writers is like, they all like, how do I sell my show? And I’m like, learn how to write first. But everyone wants to skip that step. I mean, I’m not crazy. Right? You feel the same way?

Christy Stratton:
Well, I think once, um, like Lena Dunham did it, you know, people are like, I can be that. I can be that, that Wonder kin. Um, but yeah, I think that’s never, I mean, you can do that, but then you don’t have the skills that the other end of that. Um, you know, But, but I, I mean, more power to you nowadays. They put you with somebody like me and you right. To clean it up. Although I won’t do it anymore unless I co-owned. Like, I won’t do, I won’t do that anymore.

Michael Jamin:
Hey, it’s Michael Jamen. If you like my videos and you want me to email them to, for free, join my watch list every Friday I send out my top three videos. These are for writers, actors, creative types. You could unsubscribe whenever you want. I’m not gonna spam you and it’s absolutely free. Just go to michael jamen.com/watchlist. All right. So Chris, you were talking about supervising projects from, from new writers. So please go tell us about that.

Christy Stratton:
Right. Or writers that, that need, you know, some kind of supervision. Um, one, I supervised a book author. Sorry, I’m trying to, I’m trying to get out the sun. <laugh>. All right, here we go. Um, a book author who, uh, is a writer but has, you know, not experienced in, um, writing for television. And that one was a true supervising. Like, she wrote the script. She was very clear who all the characters were because they were in her book. And I also supervised a young writer for an animated project.

Michael Jamin:
And so you were attached basically as a show runner, right? And I just wanna make sure people understand. So that means you’re basically, you’re supervisor, you’re kind of giving notes, you’re not really doing the work, and you’re not getting paid a lot of money for this.

Christy Stratton:
No, no, no, no.

Michael Jamin:
Right.

Christy Stratton:
And then I was,

Michael Jamin:
Oh, but let, lemme continue. The only reason you’re doing it is if the show goes to series, then you’re attached as the show runner to

Christy Stratton:
Be the boss’. Someone who has tried to do that for many years. Um, it was, you know, of course I’m gonna make that, I’m gonna make that gamble. And that went so well. And I, and I get sent, especially with, uh, 20th animation, they’ll send me stuff all the time. But usually it’s, I don’t spark to it. And I did spark to, uh, this one project, and, uh, it was a really funny, I mean, I, this is no disrespect to the young writer. The idea was terrific. Uh, the, the world. It was all great. So I just wanna say like that. However, when you are, um, you know, when you are new at it, you don’t know like, all right, what do I need to put in a pitch? Well, here’s, you know, you need to, nowadays you have to put that pilot story. Well, you know, and it’s animated, so okay.

Christy Stratton:
It needs to have things that are visual. And so it was a lot of, uh, uh, and like I say, thank goodness she had a, a very clear voice. So this is, you know, like I say, but it was a, it was a lot. And then I had to kind of help her break that second script. And I got $0 for that zero us. Right. And, um, and then of course it was great to be able to, you know, run a room and see this great wonderful show come to life. And so I, I wanna say that I was so proud and, uh, I loved the stuff that we all did together, but at the end of it, I am, I’m not even like, I’m not, I have no piece of it. I have no, if they could shop that someplace else mm-hmm. <affirmative>, and if they wanted to, I, you know, I would be no part of it. If, if so they so desired. So I’m kind of like, I’m, I will do this. I will put in this work, but I will not do it without, I’m coming. I’m, I’m co-owning this with you. Right. You get, you get me, but I also get, you know, because I come up with ideas like, I like my ideas, but if I, if I’m gonna like your idea and I’m gonna sink into that idea, you’re gonna have to,

Michael Jamin:
You know. Yeah. And people don’t realize that because it’s, I, we hear all the time, people, well, people say to me, I, I, you know, the studio loves my idea. I just need to get a showrunner attached. I’m like, if they love the idea, they would get a showrunner attached and they, they put up some money. But there’s not, people don’t understand the, the, the economics of it. It’s really not, it’s hard to make in the showrunners interest to invest all this time and money. Cause we don’t get the money until it’s, until it goes to the air. And so, you know, you’re just, you’re just assumed work on your own project. Why are you gonna take a risk on something, put all six months or a year’s worth of work on something and not make money from it? Yeah. And so this

Christy Stratton:
Years,

Michael Jamin:
Yeah. Right. Uh, that’s, so that’s, people don’t qu I’m surprised they, you don’t get something. Some, I mean, I don’t

Christy Stratton:
Know. Oh, I got, I got it. Like, not the second script. The second script was I did for free. I mean, I didn’t do it. She wrote it, but I mean, you know, with a guiding hand.

Michael Jamin:
Right.

Christy Stratton:
But that we did six episodes and I was just paid that a weekly rate for whatever, that 10 to 12 weeks. But we ripped for three months.

Michael Jamin:
Yeah. That was for the mini room thing. Yeah.

Christy Stratton:
It’s a mini room thing, which I hope we can, you know, this negotiation is gonna be real interesting.

Michael Jamin:
Uh, yeah. That’s kind of the latest ex people don’t know. I don’t talk about mini rooms a lot because I don’t have much experience in it. But why don’t you tell everyone Oh, okay. What a mini room is.

Christy Stratton:
See, what it is, is you are writing the entire, uh, season. So it, it, once the mini room is ordered

Michael Jamin:
Well, but back up. Right? So you just sold your pitch to the network. The network says, We like this. Go on. Right?

Christy Stratton:
Okay. Oh, okay. So that was, let’s say October, 2019. They, uh, and we got two offers, and that’s why we got to do it. Writer guilded, which that’s a whole other thing. Animation and writer guild, which we’d love to talk to you about. Yeah. But then, um, uh, so the script is written and turned in months, you know, whatever

Michael Jamin:
February, the pilot script, Right. Pilot script and the, and you got paid the person, that writer got paid to write a pilot script. Right.

Christy Stratton:
Okay. Um, then they say, Oh, we want a second script to just see if we like it. Now, the way, um, I’m gonna try to explain it as best I can. So with streamers, if it’s not picked up, there is a, a lesser rate. You know how like a a half hour, uh, plays like $27,000, something like that. Right? But if your show is under a certain budget in the, uh, um, streaming sphere, then you don’t have to pay that. You can pay this rate that’s less than that. Well, of course our budget’s less than that because we’re not picked up. So all the scripts were paid this, this break that I didn’t even know because I wrote the last script. I’m like, Oh my gosh, there’s something’s wrong with my, they’ve sent me not enough money. Yeah. Ok. That’s for the second script. The supervisor gets no dollars.

Christy Stratton:
Now, I, that was during the agency action, so I don’t know if my agents could have done like, I don’t know what would’ve happened. Right. And I, believe me, I would’ve loved to have taken a, you know, cos story by or whatever. But you live and learn. You don’t know until you’re in it. You just dunno. Right. So, um, I did that for free and that took us to the summertime of 2020. Then the summer of 2020, Oh no, no, I’m sorry. They picked up that in the summer of 2020. We turned it in near the end of 2020. Then in May of 2021, they say, We wanna keep you guys working. We love this. We wanna give you a pre green light room. So then you’re like, Okay, what, what? Because I didn’t know either. And they wanted six more scripts to have a total of eight scripts so they can look at the whole season

Michael Jamin:
Before they decide to actually produce the show.

Christy Stratton:
Correct. Right.

Michael Jamin:
And because of that, they’re just paying for scripts. And so most writers also have, most writers get paid a writing fee and on top of that, a producing fee, because we’re Right, we do both. Right. But if there’s, because we’re not producing the show, they say, No, we’re just gonna give you your writing fee.

Christy Stratton:
Well, not, it was a weekly minute, like writers go weekly, like minimum, maybe with a little bit more on it.

Michael Jamin:
Right.

Christy Stratton:
But they said, um, but they made this deal like, Oh, if we don’t pick it up by this point, then all of that is fresh cash. Like, they try to make it real.

Michael Jamin:
Um, but the truth is, you’re doing the same amount of work that you would do on an ordinary show that’s getting produced, uh, in pre-production, but you’re getting paid a fraction. Uh, it’s, it’s just, it’s kind of like an accounting trick they do to keep the cost

Christy Stratton:
Down. Yeah. I mean, so I, so we then, um, put a staff together and we had a long time, longer than I needed, but that’s just what they wanted. And well, luckily we got all these wonderful people and it was, so was Zoom, which I hope I never have to do again if I’m being really honest. Um, and um, uh, so we would just, you know, like we knew where we, so we just would break story. And like we were a staff. I tried to do a second room cuz I love small rooms. I think it is just so much better for everyone when you do small rooms.

Michael Jamin:
But you did, you have an ex but you didn’t have anybody who’s experienced in your staff, did

Christy Stratton:
You? Um, yeah. Yes, some, but, but it was kinda like, and I learned this, like, I know what I want when I send people, Okay. Think of story ideas. Let’s just say I know what I submitted. Like for Bless the Hearts, I would submit to Emily Spy who ran that show. I would submit to her like, here’s an idea. They, there’s the president’s physical fitness test that Violet has to take. And then I would do a possible, um, like scenario on where that leads to like a paragraph mm-hmm. <affirmative>. Um, but because these writers that I hired who I thought were wonderful, all had so many ideas. So this was, this is an embarrassment of riches. This is not any sort of a a a dis but it would just be just ideas and ideas and ideas and ideas. And so I, you know, it’s hard to kind of explain, well, this is what I want, and then I’m like, do I sound like I’m an, you know, um, a bad person?

Christy Stratton:
But, but, um, so you, you, it just takes time to get in a groove and when you have 10 weeks. Yeah. Like, they’re not gonna know what, how, what, how to present it and how, how to curate which ones that we’re both gonna like, Cause they’re dealing with two people now. Right. They’re not just dealing with me and I get to ultimately decide, Oh no, um, it’s, it’s, you know, her show and I am there to kind of facilitate and help and do what I can. Um, uh, so we ended up not doing that as, as much as, and, and we did would send off a, uh, hey, write this scene and it would come back wonderful. Right. Um, but um, then at the end of it, you send it off and they were like, Oh, which three do you want people to? Were like, Well, you know, I let her decide that. And she kind of got the last, you know, um, go through of whatever she wanted. And then was October. And thank goodness I had another show to jump on. And then they didn’t, they didn’t pass us until like the following January. Yeah.

Michael Jamin:
That’s how it goes.

Christy Stratton:
Yeah. And, and we thought because we had such, our, our execs were so enthusiastic and so great and, and we were sure that it was gonna go. But what was so interesting was because all of that time it took to do that, which was, you know, however, two years, um, their, they were noticing it cause it was Amazon. They were noticing that the animation that was doing well for them was more genre animation. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. So they’re like, Well, you’re gonna see we’re gonna pick up a comedy, but, but you know, after that it’s just gonna be genre. So it was just kind of like, ugh. Cause we did this beautiful, you know, funny, wonderful thing and

Michael Jamin:
Right. So you’re also at the whim of whatever’s wor whatever hits what working they’re gonna wanna copy. And if, if whatever’s not working, you’re fo that’s, if you’re like that, you’re, you’re kind of screwed. And, and what people would also don’t realize is that the executives overseeing your show, they’re always very enthusiastic, but they’re usually not the decision maker. <laugh> the boss. The boss has a different opinion. And so they always tell you they’re that, Oh, we’re so excited about this show. We’re all talking about this show. Like, who’s we <laugh> just the people who are on that level. But you know, the, so that’s another, that’s another obstacle.

Christy Stratton:
And the comedy they did pick up was like Natasha Leone and, uh, Maya Rudolph, they’re producing it. They’re starring in it. And it’s like, we can’t compete with that, even though I think on the page, who knows? But Right. That was just like, Oh god. Yeah. You know,

Michael Jamin:
It’s a hard business. Yeah. And so what, what is next for you? What is next for you? What do you, you know, other than this pitch pitching

Christy Stratton:
This thing, I’m pitching, uh, this ridiculous thing, then I’ve got these two scripts I’m sitting on. One has a director and, and two producers attached. The other one has a, uh, uh, piece of, uh, acting talent attached that we’re, we’re just looking and waiting because people don’t want to, you know, there, it’s a weird buying time. But at the same time, something else that sucks about the streamers is because there’s only eight episodes, Mindy Kaling can do every single show made because only doing eight episodes, you can do four shows a year. Yeah, right. Do all the shows. Right. And, and because these buyers, whatever is going on, they just wanna, they want the big people. They want and they, and which, whatever. I get it. It’s hard to have a hit. It’s hard. So you wanna bank on those same people and guess what?

Christy Stratton:
Those same people will be available because they’re only doing eight episodes of this show. Right. So anyway, so I’m sitting on these two waiting for, um, uh, we’re trying to get a director with a one I wrote a screenplay and, um, my new manage, oh, it’s now, um, to an actress. Um, because we tried to go to producers, but that didn’t work. Comedies in movies, it’s just hard. It’s mm-hmm. <affirmative> hard. And I’m like, I, I, I just love comedy. I, that’s what I do. That’s what I, I wish I could write a procedural or a drama. And those are all valid and great things. I can’t do that <laugh>, I can’t do that. I can’t write, um, murder, comedy murders, like I can’t, or a, a like a, um, mystery, the comedy mystery. And I’m like, Great. I think that’s cool as hell. And when I see it, I get into it. I love it, but I like a straight up comedy and I, I’m like, and it doesn’t cost that much, but yet, anyway, so I’ve got those things. Mm-hmm. <affirmative> and, you know, and then I’ll, I’ll, So I’m, it’s a little bit of kind of waiting and then, and then trying to see, there’s staffing opportunities that, um, that come up. And cuz I know people, so it’s like, well, what are their needs? And

Michael Jamin:
Interesting,

Christy Stratton:
Like, I love, I love being on a staff. I love that whole thing. I, I just hope it’s not on,

Michael Jamin:
On Zoom, if you can get those jobs. Yeah. Christie Stratton, I wanted we’re, we’re pretty much at the end of our time here, but thank you. I, this was a, a very interesting talk. I really, I, I’ve enjoyed this. I definitely Oh good. I definitely enjoy this. So, uh, is there anything else you wanna tell people who are listening? Is there anything you wanna, one last parting thing, Should they follow you somewhere especially?

Christy Stratton:
Oh, yeah. Well, I’m on Twitter and, but I don’t tweet a lot, but I’m on Instagram at Christy Stratton, but I’m on, I’m Christy s man on Twitter for whatever reason. But here’s another thing. Young writers. Yeah, new writers. It’s a tough time coming outta Covid with all the shakeups at all, the, you know, all the streamers and everyone, It is a weirdest hail time right now anyway, so just keep doing your things. Keep whatever little creative outlet that you can do. And with the internet, my gosh, you can do anything. Yeah. And just keep doing that because it’s, it’s a hard time because of all that, but because these staff, and there’s not any money, there’s more low level writers than there are upper level mm-hmm. <affirmative>, which wasn’t how, when we came up. So that’s a good thing. And, and you know, if you’re good and someone’s gonna, you’re gonna get someone’s attention and then they, they’ll know somebody and then they know somebody. And all the time, like, I still, uh, uh, have friends that I met 20 years ago with the Groundlings or whatever, and then that will, they’ll point me in the right direction for something. Or, you know, Oh, guess what? This person I did a pilot for, Right? It’s now the head of 20th television or whatever. You just, it just take all of that takes time.

Michael Jamin:
Right. But you gotta be good. This is what I heard, but you just said you have to be good and it really helps to be in LA because this is where the fish swim.

Christy Stratton:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. Right. But you don’t have to be good right away.

Michael Jamin:
Right. You don’t have to be good right away, but you have to work

Christy Stratton:
On Yes. You have to, As long as every year you can be like, Okay, here’s how I’ve improved this year. Here’s how I’ve moved forward. Just even a little bit, Right? Like, but, and oh, one more thing. Yeah. Oh my God, this is probably the most important thing of all these two hours we’ve been talking. Be flexible. Take notes. Don’t, don’t be like, Well, this is what this guy says. Or, Oh, well this is what I, I put that in there because B, B B, B B, if someone’s gonna take time to read your script, I don’t care if it’s, I don’t care who it is, and it’s the hardest thing, and I still do it. When my husband reads my stuff, I’ll be like, Well, that’s why I, I’ll bark at him. Right. But don’t just thank you. Oh, I’ll, I’ll think that. And someone may give you notes that completely up in your script and just, you kind of put it away, Have a glass of wine, watch British baking, let it kind of meld in whatever. And then like, Okay, is this person that took this advice or whatever, do, will this change it in a good way? Am I ready to do that? But, but while you’re getting notes to be nothing but great. Yes. No, I think that’s a great idea. Or, Oh, just be flexible. Be

Michael Jamin:
Open

Christy Stratton:
Notes. Be open, because it, you don’t, you’re not gonna be the, you’re not the ultimate. You don’t know everything. And it’s so hard. Cause when I get notes, I’ll be like, Oh yeah, that is better than what I have. Like, Oh yeah. That is even now’s and gracious about it.

Michael Jamin:
Christy Strat, thank you so much for, for joining us and for people listening. Thank you. Until next week, uh, get on my newsletter. My free newsletter goes every Friday. Phil sends it out. Sign up, go to michael jamin.com/watch list for more tips. And thank you again, Chris. You’ll follow her on Instagram and Twitter everywhere you could find, uh, Christy Stratton’s. Were sold. All right. Thanks again everyone. Bye. Bye. Bye.

Phil Hudson:
This has been an episode of Screenwriters Need to Hear This with Michael Jamon. If you’d like to support this podcast, please consider subscribing, leaving your review and sharing this podcast with someone who needs to hear it. Today’s subject for free daily screenwriting tips. Follow Michael on Instagram, Facebook, and TikTok at Michael Jamin, writer. You can follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and TikTok at Phil Hudson. This episode was produced by Phil Hudson and edited by Dallas Crane. Until next time, keep writing.

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Michael Jamin, Showrunner, TV Writer, Author

Michael Jamin

For the past 26 years, Michael Jamin has been a professional television writer/showrunner. His credits include King of the Hill, Beavis & Butthead, Wilfred, Maron, Just Shoot Me, Rules of Engagement, Brickleberry, Tacoma FD and many more.

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